HP to launch its 3D printers with a hope to drive the ‘next industrial revolution’


The tech company HP wants to drive the “next industrial revolution” and spark a change in the way products are manufactured with its new 3D printers. The company is all set to come up with their first 3D printers this year as revealed by Cathie Lesjak, chief financial officer for HP, at an conference.

The company which is now preparing for the big launch, first announced 3D printers in 2014. HP is looking to hire materials experts, mechanical engineers, managers and sales people for its push into 3D printing.

HP has a rich history in printing and is entering a 3D printing market that, over the past 20-plus years, has been marred by support and technology problems. HP wants to make 3D printing quicker, cheaper and faster for businesses.

“We’re really not terribly interested in consumer 3D [printing], we’re interested in commercial. The technology offers several advantages for businesses. Instead of using multiple machines to make a product, businesses will be able to use a single 3D printer to make parts, Lesjak said.

With this new printer, Companies will be able to cut manufacturing costs by making products in-house. With the ability to print parts when needed, companies don’t have to worry about holding excess inventor.

HP wants to provide a complete set of tools to bring 3D objects to life. Users can create and manipulate 3D objects with the innovative Sprout desktop. HP also wants to enable users to print 3D objects from virtual worlds.

The upcoming 3D printer of HP is based on so-called multi jet technology, which mixes conventional 3D printing technology with new techniques and materials. The 3D printing process involves fusing material with a fluid jetted out of the print head. Heat is applied to solidify the 3D object, and another material is applied to enhance the finish. The process is repeated several times.

The HP printer will support advanced inks and materials. It will also use design rules and precision production methods typically applied to integrated circuit manufacturing.

HP’s 3D printers will use a technology called binder-jetting, using ink and colorant to merge and make objects. That technology was commercialized in the 1990s by Z Corp., a company ultimately acquired by 3D Systems.

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