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Mozilla gives a new look itself.

siliconreview Mozilla gives a new look itself.

This came as a surprise to all when a big tech company reveals its new identity. Many of us haven’t come across Mozilla‘s new logo, to get 2017 started though, Mozilla has decided to give itself a new look that one which marks pretty radical break with its old brand identity. We might have seen the new Mozilla logo which takes its cue from the way URLs are formed (moz://a), URL language reinforces that the Internet is at the heart of Mozilla, which had several design candidates the company floated last fall.

The new “Zilla” font that makes up the new logo is good Mozilla fashion available for free and under an open source license. “Because it has a portion of URL embedded in the middle of the logo, you know this must be some kind of internet company,” says Tim Murray, Mozilla’s creative director .logo was  designed by Typotheque, which was also the first foundry to release web-based fonts back in the dark ages of the web. The second thing Murray hopes the new identity will do is work in tandem with the “maker spirit” of the Mozilla community, it should welcome members to play with it.

“Sometimes people were writing essays about the pros and cons of our seven approaches,” says Michael Johnson, the Johnson Banks creative director in charge of the Mozilla project, but some feedback make it to final stage.

Many commenters   were put off that the real “Protocol” used a capital “M,” when a URL code uses all lowercase letters, the final mark has a lowercase “m.” Other commenter went against the idea completely calling the “http://” code is a old phase of the web, but Murray and Johnson rejected those comments, but pressed onward with the idea. We can invite all the feedback, but the fact is you can never convince everyone, especially when it comes to internet things.

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