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Britain government can access your personal data easily

siliconreview Britain government can access your personal data easily

When you step on British land, the first thing you will experience is getting your personal data accessed by the government easily. The UK government is very serious about its secret surveillance plans. You might have come across the British government passing "Snoopers' Charter"- a.k.a the Investigatory Powers Act. This makes IT companies hand over their web history with a retention notice and removes encryption, on request.

 Now they are more concerned about services like WhatsApp, which offer end-to-end encryption.

Government’s intruding on your data by allowing Open Rights Group (ORG) - a privacy advocacy group that recently published a leaked copy of the draft technical capability notices paper. The document gives detail content on how all communications companies will be forced to break their encryption and be legally required to create a backdoor so authorities can read all communications- All telecommunications companies and platforms over 10,000 UK users, which includes WhatsApp, have to "provide and maintain their capability to disclose, where practicable, the content of communications or secondary data in an intelligible form and to remove electronic protection applied by or on behalf of the telecommunications operator to the communications or data." WhatsApp is looking forward to modify their products to enable intercept and metadata collection.

“These powers could be directed at companies like WhatsApp to limit their encryption, the regulations would make the demands that [Home Secretary] Amber Rudd made to attack end-to-end encryption a reality. But if the powers are exercised, this will be done in secret. The powers would also limit the ability of companies to develop stronger security and encryption; they could be forced to run future development plans past the Government." - Said Jim Killock, ORG's executive director.

 

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