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Now, Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer is Likely Possible with This Solution

siliconreview Now, Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer is Likely Possible with This Solution

Around 150,000 women around the world are killed every year because of ovarian cancer, but now possibly, the disease can be detected at an early stage. Thanks to a team of scientists from Australia who has developed a new blood testing solution by using a bacterial toxic which has the capacity to dramatically improve the detection ofovarian cancer.

The scientists were from Griffith University and the University of Adelaide. They published their study in the journal Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications.

To conduct the experiment, the scientists collected blood samples from over 90% of the woman with stage one ovarian cancer. After that, they tested their blood with the help of the solution they had created. After the test, the scientists were able to detect a good amount of cancer glycans in the blood. So, it is clear that the solution is effective enough to possibly detect the disease at an early stage.

Finally, after the complete research and experiment process, the scientists carefully studied the mechanism involved between the toxin and an abnormal glycan (sugar) expressed on the surface of human cancer cells. After that, they collected a portion of two to spot glycans of the ovarian cancer patients. Later on, the blood samples were given for final tests before they were publicly available.

According to James Paton, Professor at the University of Adelaide's Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, it’s very difficult to detect ovarian cancer in its early stages, the new test will be a potential game-changer in detecting the disease.

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