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10 Amazing Women Leaders to Watch 2022

‘Everything is possible when you learn to live outside of your comfort zone’: Alyeah E. Ramjit, Associate Director & Chief of Staff, Office of the Chief Transformation Officer, Mount Sinai Health System

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In recent times, the healthcare sector has changed a lot, with many powerful women at the helm in different areas of health and medicine. As the COVID-19 pandemic set in, telemedicine found its footing and made its way towards the mainstream. Women were at the forefront, helping it come to the fore.

Alyeah E. Ramjit, Associate Director & Chief of Staff, Office of the Chief Transformation Officer, Mount Sinai Health System, is one of the foremost leaders in the healthcare space, breaking barriers and redefining the healthcare sector to make it accessible.

In an interview with us, Ms. Ramjit shined some light on the importance of women supporting other women in the corporate environment. She also talked about her struggles and growth in this interview. Read on for the excerpts.

Q. Could you tell us a bit about your role at Mount Sinai Health System?

In my current role, I serve as the Chief of Staff and Associate Director in the Office of the Chief Transformation Officer at Mount Sinai Health System and Office of the President at Mount Sinai Morningside in New York City. In this role, I support initiatives to transform patient experience, system learning and continuous improvement. At the hospital level, I support initiatives to transform operations, strategic alignment and business development.

Q. How has your role evolved in this past year as the world was hit by the pandemic? How have you helped the workforce at Mount Sinai Health System navigate these difficult times?

My role has evolved for the better over the past year and so have I as a person. The rate at which turnover has occurred reflects on what people truly want in their lives. It also puts into perspective how valuable time can be. Mount Sinai Health System has implemented initiatives such as Recharge Rooms, creation of Wellness Centers and Pet Therapy days among others which have a large focus on employee physical and mental health.

Q. As one of the most eminent women leaders in healthcare, what has been the biggest challenge in your journey so far?

I have always found that my biggest challenge to date had consistently been myself. Early on in my career, I wanted others to believe in me and I thought that being dependent on others perception of me was going to help me grow but eventually I learned I must firstly work on developing myself, understanding my personality, the way I interact with others, gain a further understanding of my emotional quotient and the way I use emotional intelligence to further help navigate my career path. I also came to understand that knowing your skillsets and being able to speak to those assists in creating non-traditional career opportunities. In addition, observing others styles and personalities has helped me work on improving myself thereby providing me with the tools to understand the decision making process of my career growth.

Q. How important is it for women in business to mentor and guide other women-leaders who are emerging?

Mentorship and sponsorship are extremely important for women in particular, especially, as women aim to move into higher powered positions. If we do not assist each other to grow and break barriers which have been placed upon us by others then we won’t have the opportunity to change perspectives or influence decision making. Women bring such depth of knowledge to the table that it would be a loss overall for societal development if women were unable to provide input.

Q. Who was/is your role model and/or leadership mentor?

Throughout my journey, I have been honored to have many mentors since my time as a student but I have had a mentor since graduate school. He has guided me and also been a sponsor in times when I was questioning my career choices. He and I share a similar personality and career path. Having a mentor has changed the way that I look at my career and it has broadened my perspectives of what I want to achieve.

Q. What do you think is the most significant barrier to female leadership today?

I think women do not support each other enough as mentors and sponsors. Women unfortunately look to compete with each other rather than uplift each other. Much of this behavior stems from insecurities and the need to fit in, but if women truly stepped into their power and embraced each other these barriers would be broken.

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Q. The leadership at Mount Sinai Health System has a strong female representation, how does it compare to the healthcare industry as a whole?

Mount Sinai Health System has been the first system in NYC to name a female President. As a woman who works for this System, I am so proud and elated at this decision by the Board of Trustees. It is encouraging to know that one of the largest System’s in NYC sees the value in having a female as leading the organization.

Q. What are you most excited about for the near future as a leader in healthcare?

I am excited to become an anchor for other female leaders and guide them to step into their self-knowing. I am also excited to watch the post COVID-19 world of healthcare develop over the next few years. Through COVID-19 so much non-traditional opportunity has opened up and I think many of these new ideas will be long lasting.

Q. What is your advice for upcoming and emerging women leaders?

My advice is always the same, be kind to yourself on the journey, be kind to those around you, enter healthcare and strive to be a leader because your decisions impact thousands if not millions of people in a singular moment. For women specifically, keep your goal at the forefront and do not compromise what you want to accomplish because others tell you it is impossible. Everything is possible when you learn to live outside of your comfort zone.

If we do not assist each other to grow and break barriers which have been placed upon us by others then we won’t have the opportunity to change perspectives or influence decision making.