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Ransomware stand out as a huge caution for governments worldwide: Microsoft

siliconreview Ransomware stand out as a huge caution for governments worldwide: Microsoft

The tech giant ‘Microsoft’ has advised governments recently alongside storing computer vulnerabilities like the leaked one at the heart of the cyberattack that has crippled computers in more than 150 countries.

To explain further, Microsoft's president and chief legal officer, Brad Smith, in a blog post wrote about what is being called the largest ransomware attack ever “The governments of the world should treat this attack as a wake up cal.”

He also advised of the danger of exploits developed by governments -- this time the NSA in America -- falling into the hands of hackers and obtaining extensive harm as is the case with the current attack which has crippled more than 200,000 computers around the world.

"An equivalent scenario with conventional weapons would be the US military having some of its Tomahawk missiles stolen," Smith wrote.

Just from the starting of the week, the Computers around the world was hacked using a security flaw in Microsoft's Windows XP operating system, an older version that was no longer given normal tech support by the US giant.

According to the Moscow-based computer security firm Kaspersky Lathe reson for which the virus was spread quickly because the offender used a digital code believed to have been developed by the US National Security Agency -- and subsequently leaked as part of a document dump.

Smith also quarrels that governments should apply rules like those regarding weapons in the physical world in cyberspace. He also distinguished that Microsoft is calling for a "Digital Geneva Convention" that would call for governments to report computer vulnerabilities to vendors rather than store, sell or exploit them.

"We need governments to consider the damage to civilians that comes from hoarding these vulnerabilities and the use of these exploits," Smith wrote.

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