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The Mystery of Fast Radio Burst Now Solved

siliconreview The Mystery of Fast Radio Burst Now Solved

The astrophysical sources of powerful enigmatic radio burst are now solved after attaining a clue through a new telescope. A new burst of lower frequency was detected and was different from any previous detection. Canada’s Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) initiated the last fall at a remote site that was in British Columbia. This latest discovered frequency will provide insights on the elusive origins of strange bright signals.

Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are typically blasts of energy. This span just for a fraction of a second but on the other hand can shine brighter than half a billion suns at radio wavelengths. FRBs will appear randomly in the sky and was initially identified in 2007. The light produced by them is so fleeting that scientists have struggled every single time to trace them back to obvious and existing sources. Only one was found to repeat Among the 35 previously known bursts. This one offers astronomers a huge advantage for a more detailed study. By confirming that the FRBs must come from sources that can survive the extreme events, astronomers find it easy to produce such intense energy. This particular repeating FRB was actually traced to a region that has intense star formation inside a very distant dwarf galaxy. On the other hand, the remaining were tantalizing and yet astronomers still put in efforts to watch for more repetitions.

The collaboration member of CHIME, Patrick Boyle of McGill University believes that this is the real key for CHIME. He also added that nobody else has this field of view.

 

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